Celebrity

Vancouver’s Ingrid Rice among 28 top editorial cartoonists in Trump parody book

Who’s That Man with Mr. Lincoln, Mommy?

A Parent’s Guide to the Trump Presidency

John Darrin and 28 editorial cartoonists (Perfect Paperback)

$14.95 | pp68


U.S. President Donald Trump has provided editorial cartoonists with plenty of material. The leader of the American people has been known to take exception to these artist’s works. It’s not an easy job.

But it is one that is key to continued freedom of the press, a cornerstone of liberal democracies. As the back cover of this book declares: “You can’t take a day off from democracy. Who’s That Man is the antidote for apathy on election day.”

Author John Darrin says that was one of the reasons that he involved editorial cartoonists to illustrate his parody tale of a family visit to Washington, D.C., where two Trump supporters walk their kids around the National Mall area with its many monuments to American history while fielding questions from the children.

“And, all the while, trying to make the absurd and deceitful activities of the Trump Administration sound good and right, with the guileless innocence and instinctive perception of children deflating the hypocrisy of the message.”

In 26 chapters corresponding to the letters of the alphabet A — Alternative Facts to Z — Zapoff, the story is told with a cartoon by a different artist on the corresponding page. Each artist has written their own biography to go with the cartoon.

Vancouver-based cartoonist Ingrid Rice is featured on the N — NAFTA page. Her career started by submitting an editorial cartoon in lieu of a letter to the editor at The Vancouver Sun, where she was a regular contributor for many years.

Rice says Trump is a treasure trove for editorial cartoonists and she checks the news a lot more than she used to just to be amazed by new developments.

“I try to limit myself to no more than two Trump cartoons a month or less, but it would be easy to do nothing but,” said Rice.

“The material is amazing, incredible really. The book is designed as something of a souvenir or a keepsake on his legacy.”

Rice says that when she got the email from Darrin about the project the letters were going fast. She took the letter N with conditions.

“It was originally supposed to be N for Nepotism, but I really wanted it to be NAFTA,” she said.

“That had been one of the thoughts the team had originally for it, but had switched back. The truth is that NAFTA has affected people on both sides of the border and I liked the non-partisan approach of having the parents being dedicated supporters while the cartoonists are there pointing out how ludicrous it all is.”


N — NAFTA pages from Who Is That Man with Mr. Lincoln, Mommy?

PNG

Rice figures that the audience for Who’s That with Mr. Lincoln, Mommy? will break down into a few groups. First there will be the “preaching to the choir” crowd who are already on board.

“And the rest will be the people who aren’t gung-ho Democrats or Republicans, but who have questions about this or that policy or occurrence and are confused by all the news, fake news, and other news out there,” she said.

“We can be one more component of that part of the story. I don’t expect we’ll be attracting any of his (Trump’s) diehard followers.”

Too bad, as there a things everyone could stand to learn in the pages of this entertaining ebook. One of them is that there is a word for a government that only comprises people the leader trusts to run the country: kakistocracy. One can wonder if Prime Minister Justin Trudeau might be leaning that way these days.

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